A Beautiful, Inexpensive, and Delicious Egg Treat

Purple Pickled Eggs

March 5, 2015   19 Comments

There is zero FD&C Red #40 in those lovely hard-boiled eggs. That brilliant color is the product of a natural source.

Wanna guess?

Beets! I mixed canned beets, white vinegar, and hard-boiled eggs in a Mason jar and this is what happened. The eggs (after 3 days of marinating in the fridge) become pickled and purple.

These would be a fun Easter treat but they also work for every day. Eat them plain for a snack (I add a little bit of salt), slice and put them on a salad for a dash of protein, or make a stunning deviled egg appetizer.

I read pickled eggs are a mainstay bar snack in some parts of the world and are excellent to chase with a shot of vodka – but you didn’t hear that from me (I will deny it if you ask me if I gave you this idea).

You can eat the pickled beets as well (and toss them into a salad, etc.)

The only hard part of this recipe is peeling all those eggs. Here is a video that I found that looks like the fastest way to get it done.

I love his “roll on the plate” method at the end. I use that every time. Also, cooling the eggs with ice will make them easer to handle.

Give these pickled eggs a try! Have you pickled eggs?

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Purple Pickled Eggs Recipe

Makes 12 eggs

12 large eggs
1-15 ounce can whole beets with their juice (or sliced ones if you can’t find whole)
2 cups white vinegar

Heat a large saucepan with enough water to cover the eggs to a boil. Using a spoon place eggs in water and then lower the heat to a simmer. Cook for 15 minutes.

Put pan into sink and add ice to cool and wait 15 minutes. Peel eggs.

Place 12 eggs into two 1 quart mason jars (6 in each jar). Add ½ the beets and beet juice to each jar. Then add 1 cup of white vinegar to each jar and top the jars with water so the eggs and beets are submerged.

Place in refrigerator and wait three days to enjoy. Pickled eggs last one month (maybe more) in the refrigerator.

One egg is 91 calories, 5.0 g fat, 1.6 g saturated fat, 3.3 g carbohydrates, 2.5 g sugar, 6.6 g protein, 0.6 g fiber, 141 mg sodium, 2 Points+

Points values are calculated by Snack Girl and are provided for information only.
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19 Comments:

Great post Snack Girl! Try this method for easy egg peeling: http://lifehacker.com/quickly-peel-a-hard-boiled-egg-by-shaking-it-in-a-glass-1683335985 It's easy and so much fun that your kids will want to help! =)

on March 5, 2015

when done do you also eat the beets

on March 5, 2015

@john - good question! Yes, the beets are delicious too! I chopped them up and put them in a salad.

on March 5, 2015

I grew up on these. It was an Easter tradition. My fathers family originated from Czechoslovakia so kielbasa and pickled beet eggs was a tradition. My dad also added onions and garlic as well. And they last for weeks. The longer you let the soak the deeper the color and flavor. We usually soak for a week. Enjoy!

on March 5, 2015

That lifehack method looks like magic!! Can't wait to try it. Thanks for recipe...eggs are an almost perfect food, and the beets and eggs are both good choices in my low-carb life!

on March 5, 2015

These are so pretty! Will do this soon. I love beets, plain, pickled, buttered. Lately I've been finding them cooked and shrink-wrapped in produce dept, and a with very long exp. date. Do you think without the juice they would work this well?

on March 5, 2015

Thanks Lisa, love pickled eggs. Have a question, it seems to me that the cold eggs would crack when lowered into boiling water. Any thoughts?

on March 5, 2015

These were a mainstay of my childhood (My family is of Polish ancestry). My mom used pickled beets in place of the vinegar. She used to make them at holidays, but now she does it all year round. Whenever she announces she's made a batch, it's a race to see who can get to her house first!

on March 5, 2015

I love beets! I'm definitely going to try this - although I think I will only do 6 eggs. My question is, does it have to be done in a mason jar? Would a Tupperware type container work? I have glass bowls that have plastic lids (fit like Tupperware) - would that work or does the seal on the bowl need to be tighter? I don't actually own any mason jars and really don't want to have to buy them since I have no where to store the extras.

on March 5, 2015

My Grandmother used to make these - Polish! She always had these around. I forgot about them. Thanks for a nice memory boost. Maybe I will start today since I am snowed in again.

on March 5, 2015

@Janet - you do not need Mason jars - you can use Tupperware or Gladware or whatever you have that is a tightly sealed container.
Thanks for your question!

on March 5, 2015

You are the best! My husband and I love, love, love these eggs. Whenever we go to certain parts of Pennsylvania, these seem to be a staple for the locals - especially in the Lancaster County area. They even sell them shrink-wrapped two packs in convenience stores. Now I don't have to wait to go there to have them. Thank you so much, Snack Girl!!

on March 5, 2015

I LOVE pickled eggs, but was always disappointed when I realized that even the ones sold at my local farm stand had Red 40 in them! Now I have to wait for this snow storm to end to go get me some beets! LOL

on March 5, 2015

I love using beets for color. I color my blanched onions for salads and hummus with beet juice. Beets have been used for centuries as a colorant.
Try putting some colored onions on top of hummus then sprinkle with sumac. It makes a nice presentation. : )

on March 5, 2015

Hi Lisa...these sound delicious! I think I'll try putting in other veggies to get pickled, like cauliflower and cucumber slices to start with. Maybe that way I can get my grandkids (have to admit, and me too) to eat more veggies!

on March 6, 2015

Snack-Girl, you inspired me to try making pickled beets! Thank you! When the beets are eaten up I'm going to use the liquid for pickling hard boiled eggs,

on March 6, 2015

So should the can of beets be pickled beets? Not that I want to add sugar, but I always though sugar was part of the pickling equation. Please enlighten me!

on March 28, 2015

@Lilyan - No, you don't want to use pickled beets - simply canned beets. Sugar is used as a flavoring agent in tons of pickling recipes. With the eggs, I do not think it would taste very good. Thanks for your questions!

on March 28, 2015

I love these, my mom used to make them all the time. Every time we would finished our store-bought pickles my mom would save the juice and put it in a big pickle jar. My mom would add more vinegar to it and then add the eggs and the beets and the juice and they were delicious. I tried the boiling method and every single one of my eggs cracked. What a disappointment since I have farm fresh eggs and my girls worked really hard for them.

on August 12, 2016


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