Fried Rice For Under 200 Calories

Cauliflower Fried Rice

August 12, 2013   9 Comments

Snack Girl knows what you are thinking. Everyone loves rice, but how could you make it low in calories?

The key isn’t some magical manufacturing method. But, I do use a magic ingredient. When I say “magic”, I mean it grows from the earth with the addition of sun, water, and a farmer’s vigilance.

Cauliflower! One cup of raw cauliflower has 25 calories and 77% of your daily value of vitamin C. One cup of cooked rice has 205 calories and 0% of your daily value of vitamin C.

Do you see how cauliflower could be a healthy substitute and shave some inches off your belly?

To make this special fried rice, you must start with Cauliflower Rice. All you do is grate or finely chop cauliflower and microwave it for 6 minutes until it is soft. I use my food processor’s grater attachment and this takes less than 10 minutes (unlike cooking real rice).

Then, you get out your frying pan or wok if you have one and add some other ingredients. I used eggs, peas, and teriyaki sauce. If you don’t have teriyaki, you could use soy sauce or just skip the sauce all together.

This is great cold or room temperature and can be made ahead to put in your lunchbox.

Have you tried cauliflower rice?

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Cauliflower Fried Rice Recipe

Makes 2 servings

2 teaspoons canola oil
2 eggs
½ cup frozen peas
2 cups cauliflower rice (see Cauliflower Rice)
1 tablespoon Teriyaki sauce

Heat oil in large frying pan to medium heat. Add eggs and scramble. When eggs are to your liking, add peas, cauliflower rice, and Teriyaki sauce. Mix and cook until heated through.

170 calories, 9.4 g fat, 13.6 g carbohydrates, 6.6 g sugar, 9.8 g protein, 4.7 g fiber, 215 mg sodium, 4 Points+

Points values are calculated by Snack Girl and are provided for information only.
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I've been using a ricer on cooked cauliflower - sounds much easier! I don't do canola oil so I'd do mostly avocado with enough toasted sesame for flavor I think (I know it's a small amount, but still).

on August 12, 2013

Karen, do you mean you use a potato ricer?

on August 12, 2013

Yup! Takes a lot of pressure though so I like SG's idea better. :)

on August 12, 2013

I use shredded cabbage stirfried with a little chicken flavored "Better Than Bouillon,"a few Tbsps. water, a little oil, soy sauce. Once the cabbage is done. I add one beaten egg to the pan and "scramble" it into the "rice." SO delicious. I shred my own cabbage, but you can buy the pre-shredded packages.

on August 12, 2013

I use the food processor, and yes, love cauli rice! I also have it raw sometimes, or microwave it to warm it up with frozen peas or sundried tomatoes w/nutritional yeast.

on August 12, 2013

I make "fried rice" cauliflower all the time, as well as other riced cauliflower dishes. I rarely pre-cook, usually just dump it in the other veges, add the soy sauce or curry or whatever flavor I'm going for, and cook for an additional 20 minutes or so. Here is another version

on August 12, 2013

hi, girl your recipes are amazing, both look wise and taste. But girl I need a help from you, I want some recipes for the people suffering gastritis please ....

on August 12, 2013

Love this idea and so excited to try it!!!!

on August 12, 2013

Sigh. You know, as one who grew up in a time when products were more honestly labeled (something looking like mayonnaise but made of corn syrup solids, vinegar, emulsifiers and thickeners had to be called "imitation mayonnaise"; the white stuff made of water and whey extract, containing absolutely no cream, was called what it actually is, "sour cream substitute"), I wish we'd get over this preposterous notion that CALLING something _____ makes it *really just the same as* _____ or at least just as good. Enjoy your chopped cauliflower, but why try to pretend it's rice when it isn't? Any more than "fat free sour cream" is sour cream, or "reduced fat mayonnaise" is mayonnaise.

Now you kids get off my lawn.

on August 14, 2013

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